Elementary School Program

elem-school

First Grade

First Grade Program

Teacher Page:

Development of a First Grade Child 

It is important to remember that each child is unique and that a wide range of individual differences will be apparent with any group of children. A child’s development is organized and directed. Age characteristics are broad guidelines to help us know what may be expected from children of a certain age.

The First Grade Child…

  • has a lot of energy and is excited and motivated about anything new
  • likes to be first – likes to win
  • has a short attention span

Parents Can Help By…

  • encouraging your child to accept responsibility
  • providing unconditional acceptance
  • volunteering at school
  • reading to your child every day
  • monitoring television watching
  • ensuring your child eats healthy food and gets sufficient rest
  • keeping in contact with your child’s teacher

Language Arts – Curriculum

The primary focus of language arts is for students to be able to communicate at home, in school and in the community through reading, writing, speaking, listening and “creative expression (plays, art projects, etc.)”. The Language Arts Grade Level Content Expectations (GLCE) are taught throughout the school year.

By the end of the first grade year, most students should be able to do the following:

Reading

  • read stories and informational material
  • view themselves as readers
  • differentiate among letters, words and sentences
  • identify upper and lower case letters
  • know consonant sounds
  • know beginning sounds
  • know blends (fl, br, sm)
  • know digraphs (ch, sh, th, wh)
  • begin to understand short and long vowels
  • understand compound words and contractions
  • understand what is read

Writing

  • communicate ideas in print
  • write ideas in complete sentences
  • use correct punctuation

Writing Process

  • prewriting – planning their writing
  • first draft – getting ideas down on paper
  • editing – check spelling, make changes to improve their writing
  • publishing – final copy

Listening and Speaking

  • view themselves as effective communicators
  • effectively listen and respond in a variety of situations
  • speak fluently to express thoughts clearly
  • apply knowledge and ideas drawn from text to own lives and the lives of others
  • respond appropriately to questions
  • ask questions to clarify or extend statements

Parents Can Help By…

  • talking with and listening to your child
  • showing an interest in your child’s school experiences
  • encouraging your child to follow simple directions correctly
  • model proper speech
  • encouraging your child to be a courteous listener
  • encouraging your child to use proper speech and appropriate language
  • encouraging your child to follow simple and multi step directions correctly

Stages of Literacy

Children develop literacy through the integration of listening, speaking, reading, writing and viewing. They progress through a series of stages as they develop abilities to communicate ideas, thoughts and perceptions. Children may display characteristics of more than one stage at any given time.

By completion of the grade level indicated, most students will be reading and writing at these stages:

Reading

Pre-Emergent – listens to and retells familiar stories; pretend reads; reads a story logically from wordless picture books; recognizes own name and familiar signs or labels; shows interest in and recognizes some letters

Emergent – differentiates letters from words; uses picture clues to obtain meaning; matches some initial consonant letters with sounds; repeats familiar verses and stories; begins to recognize frequently used words; begins to recognize that print is read from left to right, top to bottom; identifies upper case letters; shows progress in identifying lower case letters; understands that print represents language

Early – uses phonetic and picture clues to decode words; reads predictable or familiar text; reads high frequency words in context; understands what is read and attempts to construct meaning; recognizes words that rhyme and creates rhymes

Transitional – understands that punctuation enhances meaning; monitors and checks own reading by applying a variety of strategies (predicting, pictorial clues, rereading, reading on, context clues, phonics, sentence structure); reads to others, recalls facts from informational books; reads unfamiliar text with support; reads for pleasure

Fluent – uses and applies punctuation to enhance meaning; confidently reads and understands familiar text; uses reading to acquire information; regularly applies reading strategies; continues to increase sight vocabulary; corrects own reading based on meaning

Writing

Writing Scribbling/pictorial – combines pictures and scribbles to represent writing; shows some evidence of over-all form (scribble lists look like lists); no recognizable letters

Pre-communicative – understands that ideas can be written down; strings together random letters (upper case) and letter-like forms; prints own name and occasionally copies words; begins to use letter/sound relationship with support

Semi-Phonetic – uses letter sound relationships; uses one beginning letter to write a word; separates words with dots, dashes, spaces; begins to write left to right; understands that print holds meaning

Phonetic – shows confidence in letter/sound relationships; spells well known words correctly; leaves spaces between words; writes a complete thought; uses both upper and lower case letters; includes some vowels; demonstrates a beginning knowledge of punctuation and its use

Transitional – correctly spells some high frequency words; demonstrates a beginning knowledge of punctuation and its use; appearance of silent ‘e’ (make, life), double consonants (mitt, cliff) and vowel combinations; writes longer sentences

Standard – correctly spells many high frequency words; writes longer passages; edits and revises written work; uses larger vocabulary; uses more complex sentence structure; uses correct punctuation

Mathematics

Singapore Math is designed to equip students with sound concept development, critical thinking and efficient problem-solving skills. In Primary Mathematics, concepts are presented in a clear and sequential way to facilitate understanding and confidence. Students in grade one continue to develop the concept of number, exploring numbers to 100.

The first grade students will learn to…

  • Work with ones and 10s in place value
  • Represent and estimate numbers and quantities
  • Compare and order larger numbers
  • Develop fluency with addition and subtraction facts
  • Continue to work with addition and subtraction
  • Investigate the concepts of multiplication and division
  • Continue work in geometric shapes and measurement
  • Understand fractions in halves and fourths
  • Continue to work with money and time
  • Collect and record data

Second Grade

Second Grade Program

Teacher Page:

Development of a Second Grade Child

It is important to remember that each child is unique and that a wide range of individual differences will be apparent with any group of children. Although there is diversity, there is also consistency. A child’s development is organized and directed. Age characteristics are broad guidelines to help us know what may be expected from children of a certain age.

The Second Grade Child…

  • is friendly, cooperative and likes praise
  • is open to new ideas and likes a challenge
  • likes competition
  • enjoys hands on learning
  • is socially sensitive and sensitive to criticism
  • is very trusting
  • likes secrets, mysteries, riddles and jokes
  • can take responsibility for actions
  • has high expectations for self
  • has an enormous curiosity
  • typically still tattles

Parents Can Help By…

  • listening to your child, and encouraging expression of ideas and feelings
  • discussing life experiences with your child
  • making a chart, so your child can self monitor behavior and/or choices
  • taking your child to the library, grocery story, farm, museums, etc.
  • sharing newspaper and magazine articles relevant to your child’s interest level
  • reading to your child
  • making sure your child eats healthy foods and gets sufficient rest
  • encouraging your child’s accomplishments and abilities
  • talking about ways to control anger and emotions
  • talking about problem solving
  • keeping in contact with your child’s teacher

Language Arts – Curriculum

The primary goal is for students to communicate effectively at home, in school and in the community though reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The Language Arts Grade Level Content Expectations (GLCE) are taught throughout the school year.

By the end of second grade year, students should be able to do the following:

Reading

  • use rhyming patterns to recognize words
  • use vowel and consonant clusters to recognize words
  • read grade level high frequency words
  • read a variety of text (story, information, pattern and predictable books, fairy tales, magazines, poetry)
  • hear and see patterns in letters and words
  • continue to increase sight vocabulary

Comprehension

  • retell a story out loud including characters, setting, problem and solution

    monitor and check own reading based on meaning by applying a variety of strategies (predicting, picture

  • clues, rereading, context clues, phonics)
  • confidently read and understand grade level text
  • understand the main ideas presented in text

Parents Can Help By…

  • reading different types of materials aloud with your child daily
  • providing many types of children’s reading materials in your home
  • having your child retell a story including the characters, setting, problem and solution
  • discussing what your child learned from reading
  • relating the message to a real world context
  • having your child reread familiar books
  • practicing grade level high frequency words with your child
  • helping your child see and hear patterns in words
  • visiting libraries regularly
  • monitoring your child’s TV viewing
  • encouraging your child’s reading efforts

Writing

  • writes correctly using manuscript
  • correctly reproduces cursive letters in isolation

Spelling

  • use standard spelling of grade level words in written work
  • use strategies to spell unknown words
  • use resources to verify spelling

Writing Process

  • compose a complete piece about a topic
  • write with a central idea, supported with details
  • write text with a beginning, middle and end
  • use a variety of sentence structures
  • use interesting words
  • express complete thoughts in writing using proper spacing and beginning punctuation
  • edit for capitalization, correct spelling of grade level words and end punctuation

Parents Can Help By…

  • providing many opportunities for your child to write (stories, directions, explanations, observations, feelings, opinions)
  • encouraging your child to write correctly using manuscript
  • practicing spelling words with your child
  • helping your child reread to check for meaning and edit for capitalization, correct spelling and end punctuation
  • providing writing materials, such as pencils, markers and paper in your home
  • providing resources, such as a dictionary to verify spelling

Listening and Speaking

  • follow oral directions
  • demonstrate appropriate listening behavior
  • ask questions and offer ideas relevant to topic
  • view themselves as effective communicators
  • effectively listen and respond in a variety of situations
  • speak fluently to express thoughts clearly
  • apply knowledge and ideas drawn from text to own lives and the lives of others

Parents Can Help By…

  • talking with and listening to your child
  • showing an interest in your child’s school experiences
  • encouraging your child to follow and complete simple and multi-step directions correctly
  • encouraging your child to be a courteous listener
  • encouraging your child to use proper speech and appropriate language

Pre-Emergent – listens to and retells familiar stories; pretend reads; reads a story logically from wordless picture books; recognizes own name and familiar signs or labels; shows interest in and recognizes some letters

Emergent – differentiates letters from words; uses picture clues to obtain meaning; matches some initial consonant letters with sounds; repeats familiar verses and stories; begins to recognize frequently used words; begins to recognize that print is read from left to right, top to bottom; identifies upper case letters; shows progress in identifying lower case letters; understands that print represents language

Early – uses phonetic and picture clues to decode words; reads predictable or familiar text; reads high frequency words in context; understands what is read and attempts to construct meaning; recognizes words that rhyme and creates rhymes

Transitional – understands that punctuation enhances meaning; monitors and checks own reading by applying a variety of strategies (predicting,pictorial clues, rereading, reading on, context clues, phonics, sentence structure); reads to others, recalls facts from informational books; reads unfamiliar text with support; reads for pleasure

Fluent – uses and applies punctuation to enhance meaning; confidently reads and understands familiar text; uses reading to acquire information; regularly applies reading strategies; continues to increase sight vocabulary; corrects own reading based on meaning

Writing Scribbling/pictorial – combines pictures and scribbles to represent writing; shows some evidence of over-all form (scribble lists look like lists); no recognizable letters

Pre-communicative – understands that ideas can be written down; strings together random letters (upper case) and letter-like forms; prints own name and occasionally copies words; begins to use letter/sound relationship with support

Semi-Phonetic – uses letter sound relationships; uses one beginning letter to write a word; separates words with dots, dashes, spaces; begins to write left to right; understands that print holds meaning

Phonetic – shows confidence in letter/sound relationships; spells well known words correctly; leaves spaces between words; writes a complete thought; uses both upper and lower case letters; includes some vowels; demonstrates a beginning knowledge of punctuation and its use

Transitional – correctly spells some high frequency words; demonstrates a beginning knowledge of punctuation and its use; appearance of silent ‘e’ (make, life), double consonants (mitt, cliff) and vowel combinations; writes longer sentences

Standard – correctly spells many high frequency words; writes longer passages; edits and revises written work; uses larger vocabulary; uses more complex sentence structure; uses correct punctuation

Library Skills

The goal of library instruction is to set the groundwork for students to become lifelong library users.

Second grade students will…

  • learn about authors and illustrators
  • learn about how books are published
  • learn about fiction, non-fiction and reference books
  • learn how to find different types of books in the library

Mathematics

Singapore Math is designed to equip students with sound concept development, critical thinking and efficient problem-solving skills. In Primary Mathematics, concepts are presented in a clear and sequential way to facilitate understanding and confidence.

Second grade students will learn…

  • numbers and place value to 1000
  • addition and subtraction with and without renaming
  • methods of mental addition and subtraction
  • measurement concepts of length, weigh and capacity
  • multiplication and division
  • fractions- halves, quarters and fractions of a set
  • time- elapsed time and intervals
  • tables and graphs
  • geometry- composing and decomposing shapes
  • money- addition and subtraction
  • beginning algebra- finding unknowns

Third Grade

Third Grade Program

Teacher Page:

Development of a Third Grade Child

It is important to remember that each child is unique and that a wide range of individual differences will be apparent with any group of children. Although there is diversity, there is also consistency. Age characteristics are broad guidelines to help us know what may be expected from children of a certain age.

The Third Grade Child…

  • is increasingly self-motivated – sometimes seems driven
  • is independent, but still needs reminders
  • relates events well
  • knows the difference between right and wrong
  • is friendly, cooperative and likes praise
  • is open to new ideas and likes a challenge
  • likes competition
  • enjoys hands-on learning
  • is improving in motor skills
  • is reading to learn instead of learning to read –comprehension improves

Parents Can Help By…

  • showing an interest in your child’s progress
  • keeping contact with your child’s teacher
  • reviewing and monitoring your child’s schoolwork and homework
  • making sure your child eats healthy foods and gets sufficient rest
  • encouraging your child to assume responsibility
  • expecting the “best” out of your child

Language Arts – Curriculum

The primary goal is for students to communicate effectively at home, school and in the community by reading, writing, speaking, listening and viewing. The Language Arts Grade Level Content Expectations (GLCE) are taught throughout the school year.

By the end of the third grade year, most students should be able to do the following:

Reading

  • read fluently
  • read grade level high frequency words
  • read a variety of texts (historical fiction, tall tales, information text, magazines, poetry) for pleasure for a sustained period of time
  • use multiple strategies to recognize words
  • read and comprehend stories
  • comprehend informational text

Comprehension

  • demonstrate understanding of ideas presented within stories and informational text
  • independently retell a story including characters, setting, events, problem and solution
  • can find the main idea, locate details, and draw conclusions

Parents Can Help By…

  • being a positive reading role model by letting your child see you read different types of materials
  • encouraging your child to read a variety of reading materials
  • discussing what your child learned from reading
  • practicing grade level high frequency words with your child
  • visiting libraries regularly
  • monitoring your child’s TV viewing
  • setting aside a time for your child to read independently

 

Writing

  • write legibly using manuscript and cursive
  • write in complete sentences
  • write paragraphs
  • writes letters, stories and reports
  • understand parts of speech

Spelling

  • use standard spelling of grade level words in written work
  • use resources to verify spelling

Writing Process

  • gather and organize information
  • write text with a beginning, middle and end
  • write with voice (expression)
  • edit for complete sentences, spelling, capitalization and punctuation
  • use logs, journals and illustrations to record learning
  • can choose the best kind of writing to convey their meaning

Parents Can Help By…

  • providing many opportunities for your child to write (stories, directions, observations, feelings and opinions)
  • encouraging your child to write legibly using manuscript and cursive
  • practicing spelling words with your child
  • helping your child reread to check for meaning and edit for capitalization, spelling, correct usage and punctuation
  • providing resources, such as the dictionary, to verify spelling

Listening and Speaking

  • follow oral directions
  • demonstrate appropriate listening behavior
  • speak fluently to express thoughts clearly
  • apply knowledge and ideas drawn from text to own lives and the lives of others

Parents Can Help By…

  • talking with and listening to your child
  • showing an interest in your child’s school experiences
  • giving multi-step directions to your child
  • encouraging your child to be a courteous listener
  • encouraging your child to use proper speech and appropriate language

Library Skills

The goal of library instruction is to give the students an understanding of how information is organized and how to access that information using the different types of materials in the library. Students will also be introduced to the different types of fiction and non-fiction literature.

Third grade students will…

  • learn what types of books are available to answer homework questions
  • learn how to use a books index and table of contents to locate information
  • learn about the different types of fiction and information books available in the library.

 Mathematics

Singapore Math is designed to equip students with sound concept development, critical thinking and efficient problem-solving skills. In Primary Mathematics, concepts are presented in a clear and sequential way to facilitate understanding and confidence.

Third grade students will learn…

  • numbers and place value to 10,000
  • mental methods of addition and subtraction
  • multiplication and division facts to 10
  • multiplication and its relationship to division
  • data analysis and probability
  • fraction equivalencies
  • fraction of a whole
  • adding and subtracting fractions with like denominators
  • money-multiplication, division and fractions
  • measurement- length, weight and capacity
  • geometry- angles and triangles

Fourth Grade

Fourth Grade Program

Teacher Page:

Development of a Fourth Grade Child

It is important to remember that each child is unique and that a wide range of individual differences will be apparent with any group of children. Although there is diversity, there is also consistency. A child’s development is organized and directed. Age characteristics are broad guidelines to help us know what may be expected from children of a certain age.

The Fourth Grade Child…

  • searches for perfection
  • is affectionate with parents, and has lots of family concerns
  • is loyal
  • uses simple logic
  • likes rules and teamwork
  • is highly selective in friendships
  • responds to peer pressure
  • uses thought and deductive reasoning
  • is interested in other people’s ideas
  • asserts leadership
  • is more independent
  • is highly interested in learning

Parents Can Help By…

  • keeping communication lines open
  • engaging in meaningful conversation frequently
  • keeping in contact with your child’s teacher
  • setting limits
  • encouraging interests and talents
  • letting your child make decisions and solve problems
  • making sure your child eats healthy foods and gets sufficient rest
  • monitor and assist with homework assignments and test preparation

Language Arts – Curriculum

The primary goal for language arts education is for students to communicate effectively at home, school and in the community by reading, writing, speaking, listening and viewing. The Language Arts Grade Level Content Expectations (GLCE) are taught throughout the school year.

By the end of the fourth grade year, most students should be able to do the following:

Reading

  • read fluently
  • read grade level high frequency words
  • read a variety of text (realistic and historical fictions, informational text, magazines, poetry) for pleasure for a sustained period of time
  • use multiple strategies to recognize words

Comprehension

  • demonstrate understanding of ideas presented within stories and informational text
  • compare and contrast stories focusing on story elements
  • independently select the appropriate strategy to construct the central meaning of text

Parents Can Help By…

  • being a positive reading role model by letting your child see you read different types of materials
  • encouraging your child to read a variety of reading materials
  • discussing what your child learned from reading
  • visiting libraries regularly
  • designating a time for your child to read independently

Writing

  • write legibly

 Spelling

  • use spelling grade level words in written work

Writing Process

  • gather and organize information
  • use prewriting, rough draft, revision, and editing to improve writing
  • write text with a beginning, middle and end
  • write with voice and style
  • edit for complete sentences, correct usage, spelling, capitalization and punctuation
  • compose stories and informational pieces with central idea supported with details

Parents Can Help By…

  • providing many opportunities for your child to write (directions, letters, journals, stories)
  • encouraging your child to write legibly using manuscript and cursive
  • practicing spelling words with your child
  • helping your child edit for capitalization, spelling, correct usage, complete sentences and punctuation
  • providing resources, such as a dictionary to verify spelling

Listening & Speaking

  • follow oral directions
  • demonstrate appropriate listening behavior
  • view themselves as effective communicators
  • effectively listen and respond in a variety of situations
  • speak fluently to express thoughts clearly

Parents Can Help By…

  • talking with and listening to your child
  • showing an interest in your child’s school experiences
  • giving multi-step directions to your child
  • encouraging your child to be a courteous listener

Library Skills

The goal of library instruction is to give the students an understanding of how information is organized and how to access that information using the different types of materials in the library and computer based information tools. The students will be introduced to various types of fiction and non-fiction books.

Fourth grade students will:

  • learn what types of books are available to answer homework questions
  • learn how to use a books index and table of contents to locate information
  • learn about the different types of fiction and information books that are available in the library

Social Studies

The fourth grade social studies curriculum introduces students to the history and geography of the United States, students compare and contrast selected regions of the United States and explore how each contributes to the nation as a whole.

By the end of the fourth grade year, most students should be able to do the following:

  • construct and interpret information from maps, charts and graphs
  • explain the impact of migration to the New World
  • describe the reasons Europeans settled in the New World
  • understand attributes of selected regions in the United States
  • describe the Core Democratic Values: Life, Justice, Patriotism
  • develop a position on a public issue and support the opinion

Mathematics

Singapore Math is designed to equip students with sound concept development, critical thinking and efficient problem-solving skills. In Primary Mathematics, concepts are presented in a clear and sequential way to facilitate understanding and confidence.

Fourth grade students will learn…

  • numbers and place values to 1,000,000
  • factors and multiples
  • the four operations of whole numbers, concentrating on multiplication of multi-digit numbers
  • fractions- adding and subtraction with like and related denominators
  • fractions of a set
  • the four operations of decimals
  • coordinate graphs
  • data analysis and probability
  • area and perimeter of regular shapes
  • measures and volume
  • geometry- plane figures, solids and nets

Fifth Grade

Fifth Grade Program

Teacher Page:

Development of a Fifth Grade Child

It is important to remember that each child is unique and that a wide range of individual differences will be apparent with any group of children. Although there is diversity, there is also consistency. A child’s development is organized and directed. Age characteristics are broad guidelines to help us know what may be expected from children of a certain age.

The Fifth Grade Child…

  • begins to be interested in the opposite sex
  • likes close friends
  • wants to please
  • is willing to help others
  • has intense interest in teams
  • strives for independence
  • has a strong urge to conform to peer standards
  • challenges adults knowledge
  • is self conscious in learning new skills
  • has increasing abilities to use logic
  • can be highly moral in evaluations
  • has a strong interest in the world
  • loves life, family, teacher, friends
  • likes to talk and observe more than work
  • shows good, intellectual enthusiasm for favorite subjects
  • has difficulty planning own work
  • is easily hurt and upset by criticism

Parents Can Help By…

  • encouraging your child to participate in extra-curricular team activities
  • keeping track of your child’s free time and choice of friends
  • keeping a close eye on music and video choices
  • providing opportunities to solve problems and make decisions
  • discussing current events with your child
  • encouraging your child’s talents and interests
  • keeping in contact with your child’s teacher

Language Arts – Curriculum

The primary goal is for students to communicate effectively at home, school and in the community by reading, writing, speaking, listening and viewing. The Language Arts Grade Level Content Expectations (GLCE) are taught throughout the school year.

By the end of the fifth grade year, most students should be able to do the following:

Reading

  • read fluently
  • read a variety of texts (historical and realistic fictions, myths, informational text, magazines, poetry) for pleasure for a sustained period of time
  • use multiple strategies to recognize words

Comprehension

  • demonstrate understanding of ideas presented within stories and information text
  • compare and contrast stories focusing on story elements
  • independently select the appropriate strategy to construct the central meaning of text
  • use a variety of reading strategies before, during and after reading to construct meaning (predicting, graphic aids, rereading, and context clues)

Parents Can Help By…

  • being a positive role model by letting your child see you read different types of materials
  • encouraging your child to read a variety of reading materials
  • discussing what your child learned from reading; help to relate the message to a real world context
  • helping your child make connections between different sources of a similar topic
  • visiting libraries regularly
  • monitoring your child’s TV viewing
  • designating a time for your child to read independently

Writing

  • write legibly

Spelling

  • use standard spelling of grade level words in written work
  • use multiple resources to verify spelling

Writing Process

  • gather and integrate information
  • use a variety of research techniques
  • compose stories and informational pieces with central idea supported with details
  • write text with a beginning, middle and end
  • write with voice and style
  • use logs, journals and illustrations to record learning
  • edit for complete sentences, correct usage, spelling, capitalization and punctuation
  • revise text to clarify and expand meaning

Parents Can Help By…

  • providing many opportunities for your child to write (stories, directions, explanations, observations, feelings, journals and opinions)
  • encouraging your child to write legibly using manuscript and cursive
  • practice spelling words with your child
  • helping your child edit for capitalization, spelling, correct usage, complete sentences and punctuation
  • providing resources, such as dictionary, to verify spelling

Listening and Speaking

  • follow oral directions
  • demonstrate appropriate listening behavior
  • ask questions and offer ideas relevant to topic
  • integrate listening, speaking, viewing, reading and writing skills for multiple purposes
  • speak fluently to express thought clearly

Parents Can Help By…

  • talking with and listening to your child
  • showing an interest in your child’s school experiences
  • giving multi-step directions to your child
  • encouraging your child to be a courteous listener
  • modeling proper speech
  • encouraging your child to use proper speech and appropriate language
  • encouraging your child to ask questions and offer ideas relevant to the topic

Library Instruction

The goal of library instruction is to give students the understanding of how information is organized and how to access that information using the different types of materials in the library and on the World Wide Web. The students will be introduced to the different types of fiction and non-fiction literature.

Fifth grade students will:

  • use multiple types of reference books to locate information
  • learn how to use the library for research papers and school projects

History – Curriculum

Through a chronological study of the major eras of American history, fifth graders learn about the geography, history, economics, and government of their country. In their study of American history, students identify and analyze people, issues and events significant to an understanding of America’s past and current role in the complex world. Students explore public issues in US history and express their thinking about the issues both orally and in writing.

By the end of the fifth grade year, most students should be able to do the following:

  • explain the impact of migration to the New World
  • describe the reasons Europeans settled in the New World
  • describe the events and results of the American Revolution
  • understand the development of the New Nation
  • describe the effects of the westward expansion
  • understand how current events affect our country and the world
  • understand Core Democratic Values
  • understand the concepts of natural resources, human capital, capital equipment, opportunity cost,
  • scarcity, export and import
  • explain how prices are determined in a market economy
  • understand how to use the research process to analyze, respond and share a position
  • write a persuasive letter to take a stand on a public policy issue
  • understand how the federal government works

Mathematics

Singapore Math is designed to equip students with sound concept development, critical thinking and efficient problem-solving skills. In Primary Mathematics, concepts are presented in a clear and sequential way to facilitate understanding and confidence.

The fifth grade students will learn…

  • numbers and place values to 1,000,000,000
  • multiplying and dividing by powers of ten
  • factors and multiples
  • division with two-and three-digit numbers
  • fractions-comparing, fractions of a set, adding and subtracting with unlike denominator, multiplying and dividing
  • area and perimeter of regular and irregular shapes
  • angels
  • percentage
  • volume of rectangular prisms

Simple Calendar

September 2017

Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
1
  • PTO Meeting with Parents
  • College Visits in Food Court area
2
3
4
  • College Fair in Library
5
  • Univ. Visits: Emory, Dartmouth, Tufts, BC, U of Richmond
6
  • Clubs Fair in Tiger Square
7
  • Elections (Board & Vote Counting Committee)
  • Vp arts
8
9
  • ACT Exams
10
11
12
  • K4 & K5 Cub Meeting: Independence Day
13
  • 1st-5th Tiger Meeting "Independence Day " - C.A.A
  • Secondary School Independence Day Celebration, CAA
  • PK3 Little Cub Meeting "Independence Day" - Primary Basketball Court
14
  • Independence Day Holidays
15
16
17
18
19
  • Math MAP testing for ALL 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th
  • Univ. Anahuac/Mexico - Room: 504
20
  • Parent Conference, Library
21
  • Reading MAP testing for ALL 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th
22
  • Reading MAP testing for ALL 6th, 7th and 8th
23
24
25
  • Language Usage MAP testing for ALL 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th
  • Tec. de Monterrey/Mexico - Room: 504
26
27
  • CIS College Tour (30 universities)
28
  • Reading MAP Test for ALL 9th Graders
29
  • Annual General Parent Assembly, Ossi Room
30

Contact Us

American Nicaraguan School
Phone #: (505) 2252-7310-12
From USA: +17862692117

English Language Institute
Phone #: (505) 2252-7319

P.O. Box 2670
Lomas de Monserrat
Managua, Nicaragua

Simple Calendar

September 2017

Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
1
  • PTO Meeting with Parents
  • College Visits in Food Court area
2
3
4
  • College Fair in Library
5
  • Univ. Visits: Emory, Dartmouth, Tufts, BC, U of Richmond
6
  • Clubs Fair in Tiger Square
7
  • Elections (Board & Vote Counting Committee)
  • Vp arts
8
9
  • ACT Exams
10
11
12
  • K4 & K5 Cub Meeting: Independence Day
13
  • 1st-5th Tiger Meeting "Independence Day " - C.A.A
  • Secondary School Independence Day Celebration, CAA
  • PK3 Little Cub Meeting "Independence Day" - Primary Basketball Court
14
  • Independence Day Holidays
15
16
17
18
19
  • Math MAP testing for ALL 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th
  • Univ. Anahuac/Mexico - Room: 504
20
  • Parent Conference, Library
21
  • Reading MAP testing for ALL 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th
22
  • Reading MAP testing for ALL 6th, 7th and 8th
23
24
25
  • Language Usage MAP testing for ALL 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th
  • Tec. de Monterrey/Mexico - Room: 504
26
27
  • CIS College Tour (30 universities)
28
  • Reading MAP Test for ALL 9th Graders
29
  • Annual General Parent Assembly, Ossi Room
30
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